Skip Navigation

Introduction to NDPC

LAWS AND FUNCTIONS

The National Development Planning Commission (NDPC) was established under Articles 86 and 87 of the 1992 Constitution as part of the Executive. The National Development Planning Commission Act, 1994, (Act 479) and the National Development Planning (System) Act, 1994, (Act 480), provide the core legal framework for the establishment of the Commission and the performance of its functions. (Other laws of relevance to the Commission’s work are:  the Local Government Act (Act 462) 1993; Local Government Service Act (Act 656) 2003; Petroleum Revenue Management Act (Act 815) 2011; Civil Service Act (PNDC Law 327) 1993; and Ghana Infrastructure Investment Fund Act, (Act 877), 2014). 

Article 86 stipulates that the Commission shall consist of the following (Commissioners):

(i) A Chairman who shall be appointed by the President in consultation with the Council of State;

(ii) The Minister responsible for Finance and such other Ministers of State as the President may appoint;

(iii) The Government Statistician;

(iv) The Governor of the Bank of Ghana;

(v) One representative from each region of Ghana appointed by the Regional Coordinating Council of the region; and

(vi) Such other persons as may be appointed by the President having regard to their knowledge and experience of the relevant areas and roles pertaining to development, economic, social, environmental and spatial planning.

The Commission operates through a number of committees whose composition changes with the focus of a medium-term development plan (in the case of the Thematic Committees) or the needs of the Commission ...

See more.

LAWS AND FUNCTIONS

The National Development Planning Commission (NDPC) was established under Articles 86 and 87 of the 1992 Constitution as part of the Executive. The National Development Planning Commission Act, 1994, (Act 479) and the National Development Planning (System) Act, 1994, (Act 480), provide the core legal framework for the establishment of the Commission and the performance of its functions. (Other laws of relevance to the Commission’s work are:  the Local Government Act (Act 462) 1993; Local Government Service Act (Act 656) 2003; Petroleum Revenue Management Act (Act 815) 2011; Civil Service Act (PNDC Law 327) 1993; and Ghana Infrastructure Investment Fund Act, (Act 877), 2014). 

Article 86 stipulates that the Commission shall consist of the following (Commissioners):

(i) A Chairman who shall be appointed by the President in consultation with the Council of State;

(ii) The Minister responsible for Finance and such other Ministers of State as the President may appoint;

(iii) The Government Statistician;

(iv) The Governor of the Bank of Ghana;

(v) One representative from each region of Ghana appointed by the Regional Coordinating Council of the region; and

(vi) Such other persons as may be appointed by the President having regard to their knowledge and experience of the relevant areas and roles pertaining to development, economic, social, environmental and spatial planning.

The Commission operates through a number of committees whose composition changes with the focus of a medium-term development plan (in the case of the Thematic Committees) or the needs of the Commission as determined by its current members (the Standing Committees).   

In accordance with the provision under Article 87 of the Constitution, the core mandate of the Commission is to “advise the President on development planning policy and strategy” and, “at the request of the President or Parliament, or on its own initiative,” do the following:  

(a) Study and make strategic analyses of macro-economic and structural reform options;

(b) Make proposals for the development of multi-year rolling plans taking into consideration the resource potential and comparative advantage of the different districts of Ghana;

(c) Make proposals for the protection of the natural and physical environment;

(d) Make proposals for ensuring the even development of the districts of Ghana by the effective utilisation of available resources; and

(e) Monitor, evaluate and coordinate development policies, programmes and projects.

The Commission, according to the Constitution, “shall also perform such other functions relating to development planning as the President may direct”.

Act 479 operationalises these broad functions by prescribing, among other things, the qualifications and tenure of Commissioners; the composition and responsibilities of staff of the Commission; the divisions of the Commission; as well as “financial and miscellaneous provisions” dealing with matters such as funds of the Commission, auditing requirements and annual reports.

According to the Act, the Commission shall have a Director-General who “shall be appointed by the President acting in accordance with the advice of the Commission given in consultation with the Public Services Commission.”   Subject to the general direction of the Commission, the Director-General is “responsible for the efficient organization and management of the Commission.” It states further that all government departments, agencies, and “other public authorities… shall cooperate fully with the Commission in the exercise of its functions under the Act”.   The Commission works very closely with the Ministry of Finance, formerly the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning.

DIVISIONS OF THE COMMISSION

The Commission has three technical divisions and a fourth one for administration.  The technical divisions are:  Development Policy; Plan Coordination; and Monitoring and Evaluation.

Development Policy Division 

The Division is responsible for technical support to the government on policy formulation, review, and analysis; identification and selection of sound policy advice based on research.

Plan Coordination Division 

The Division is responsible for coordinating all development policies, plans, programmes and projects between the national and local governments.  It facilitates the achievement of the decentralised planning system outlined in Act 480 by synthesising the decentralised district plans and the plans of non-decentralised public bodies into a draft national development plan for the consideration of the Commission.

Monitoring and Evaluation Division

The Division is responsible for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of government policies, programmes and projects at all levels, as well as developing and managing a functional national monitoring and evaluation system based on the decentralised planning system. Besides monitoring and evaluating the implementation of sectoral and district development plans, the Division provides support to MDAs and District Assemblies in building their capacity for effective monitoring and evaluation of their respective development plans. 

General Service Division

The Division is responsible for the following:  human resource management; finance; procurement; transport; estate and security; information and communications technology.

In addition to a core staff of development professionals and support staff, the Secretariat is also home to a number of professionals on secondment from various government agencies, technical advisors and contract staff. 

 

WORK OF THE COMMISSION

Since its formation, the Commission has worked closely with every President under the Fourth Republic to prepare the Coordinated Programme of Economic and Social Development Policies, which the President is required by the Constitution to submit to Parliament within two years of assuming office.  The Commission also led the process of preparing the country’s first long-term (25-year) national development plan, Vision 2020, along with its first medium-term plan, Vision 2020: The First Step (1996-2000).  Other medium-term plans that the Commission has led in preparing are: Ghana Poverty Reduction Strategy (2003-2005); Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy (2006-2009); Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda I (2010-2013) and Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda II (2014-2017).

To ensure that its work is broad-based and reflects the general will of the people, the Commission is enjoined by Act 479 to establish cross-sectoral planning groups “which shall integrate and coordinate the planning and development activities of such sectors of the economy as it may determine.”  

The groups consist of the following:  

1. Representatives of the Commission;

2. Representatives of the relevant sector ministries;

3. Representatives of appropriate public sector institutions and private sector organisations; and

4. Such individuals selected for their knowledge and experience as the Commission may determine.

To promote synergy and foster mutually beneficial learning, the Commission is represented on several public bodies, including the National Council for Tertiary Education, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, the Local Government Service Council, the Ghana Investment Promotion Council, the Energy Commission, and the Institute for Social, Statistical and Economic Research.

COMMITTEES OF THE COMMISSION

Standing Committees

Committee

Members

1. Audit Report Implementation Committee

 Prof. David Millar – Convener

 Dr. Nii Moi Thompson

  Representative of Internal Audit Agency

 Representative of Institute of Internal Auditors of Ghana

2. Finance Committee

 Mr. Kwame Jantuah

 Mr. Joseph R.D. Kobinah

 Dr. Samuel Nii-Noi Ashong

 Dr. Edith Tetteh

 Dr. Fritz Gockel

3.  Administration and Human Resources

 Mr. Ebenezer Anuwa-Amarh – Convener

 Prof. Dzodzi Tsikata

 Dr. Samuel Nii-Noi Ashong

 Dr. Ato Quarshie

 Government Statistician

4.  Physical Development Committee

 Prof. Seth Asiama

 Mr. Steve Akuffo  - Convener

 Mr. George Abdul

 Prof. Seidu Al-Hassan

 Dr. Esther Ofei-Aboagye

5. Communication Committee

 Prof. Agyeman Badu  Akosa    - Convener

 Mr. Kwame Jantuah      

 Prof. Kwamena  Ahwoi

 Prof. Dzodzi Tsikata

6.  Executive Committee

 Chairman of the Commission

 Vice-Chair

 D-G

 Conveners of Committees

 

Thematic Committees

Committee

Members

1. Economic Policy

 Dr. Samuel Nii Noi Ashong – Convener

 Dr. Fritz Gockel

 Nana Oye Mansa

 Minister of Finance

 Governor of Bank of Ghana

 Government Statistician

 Minister of Trade and Industry

 Mr. Kwame Peprah

 Mr. Ebenezer Anuwa-Armah

 Minister of Food and Agriculture

2. Agriculture and Natural Resources  

 Prof. David Millar – Convener

 Dr. Emmanuel Derbile

 Amb. Donald Adabre

 Prof. Dzodzi Tsikata

 Prof. Seidu Al-Hassan

 Minister of Petroleum

 Dr. Charles Abugre

 Minister of Food and Agriculture

 Dr. Ato Quarshie

3.  Private Sector Development (& Public Sector Reforms)

 Prof. David Millar

 Minister of Trade & Industry

 Minister for Public Private Partnership

 Dr. Fritz Gockel – Convener

 Minister of Public Sector Reform

 Private Enterprise Federation

 Ghana Employers Association

 CIBA

 Governor

4.  Energy

 Mr. Kwame Jantuah

 Mr. Ebenezer Anuwa-Amarh

 Mr. Joseph R. D. Kobinah

 Minister of Petroleum

 Mr. Jacob B. Ntim-Adjei

 Minister of Power

 Minister of Finance

 Mr. Kwame Peprah – Convener

 Nana Oye Mansa

5. Human Development, Productivity and Employment

 Mr. Ebenezer Anuwa Amarh

 Ministry of Gender Children & Social Protection

 Prof. Agyeman Badu Akosa

 Prof. Dzodzi Tsikata – Convener

 Mr. George Abdul

 Dr. Edith Tetteh

 Dr. Esther Ofei-Aboagye

6.  Govenance

 Prof. Kwamena Ahwoi

 Prof. Agyeman Badu Akosa

 Prof. Seth Asiama

 Dr. Esther Ofei-Aboagye – Convener

 Minister of Local Government and Rural Development

7. Development Communication

 Prof. Agyeman Badu Akosa – Convener

 Mr. Kwame Jantuah

 Dr. Ekwow Spio-Garbrah

 Minister of Gender Children & Social Protection

 Prof. Seidu Al-Hassan

8. Infrastructure, Spatial Planning and Human Settlements

 Prof. Seth Asiama

 Dr. Emmanuel Derbile – Convener

 Amb. Donald Adabre

 Mr. Steve Akuffo

 Dr. Charles Abugre

 Minister for Local Government & Rural Development

 Mr. Jacob B. Ntim Adjei

Source:  National Developnent Planning Commission. (2015).

Hide

LATEST NEWS:

Top